Resources for Other Writers

I don’t claim to own any of the links or websites below here unless it’s something I specifically put together (not bloody likely). That being said, these are some really kick ass resources I like to draw upon. All of these services are (as of 10/17/16) free.

http://phrontistery.info/ : For archaic and highly unusual words and phrases, I go to the phrontistery. A lot of the words on the website are outdated for colloquial use, but some of them hit a certain perfection or grand strangeness that can’t be denied.

http://www.rhymezone.com/ : When you need to locate words with good meanings to rhyme or near rhyme with something you’re writing, this is the absolute place to go. Includes definitions and syllable counts. They have a forum but I rarely interact with it.

http://www.dictionary.com/ and http://www.thesaurus.com/ : Classics.

http://www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp : Society of Professional Journalist’s code of ethics. Applies to some stuff when I’m writing about specific people but am weary of including identifying information. Can also help with those looking for journalism guides.

https://www.wikipedia.org/ : Writing something you don’t know much about? Give it a once-over on Wikipedia to find out some more information about it. Usually Wikipedia will give enough reliable information to extend off of, or link to other articles that further develop my understanding of a certain thing. Like lightning elves.

https://translate.google.com/ : If you want to get especially flowery, or you’re looking to seek more exotic or intensely unintelligible words, parse anything through Google Translate. But do it a few times back and forth to make sure that it isn’t broken language.

http://textalyser.net/ : Provides a pretty nice analysis of input text. Word count, readability, most used words, all that good stuff. Copy and paste, or file upload.

 

A podcast by Tiffanny Hamilton describing the differences in interpretation of her piece “Paralleled Voyagers”.

https://www.pdfcombine.com/: Ordering 4 PDFs together and combining them (within a certain data size) has never been easier. Unless you pay to get the stupid Adobe upgrade on their PDF Reader. Which I can’t really afford as an expense, personally.